Converting Audio From Video to Text

My feature length doc film has hours of interview footage. Hours.

So now, I’m working through the footage. And I’m experimenting with ways to convert audio from video to text so I can do a paper edit.

One way is to make comments in the metadata of each clip. Then you can export the sequence from Premiere as an Avid Log Exchange file. Then change the “.ale’ to “.txt” and import to Excel. It’s not pretty of smooth, but you can see columns with time code and comments.

I tried using the old Adobe CC “speech analysis” in Premiere 7. I downloaded the previous version from the Creative Cloud and had it process a couple of clips. Let’s just say the accuracy was pretty bad. Very bad. But, I thought I could maybe use it. So I saved the project file. And then opened it in the latest version of premiere, which still kept the metadata… as speech analysis information. But, when I exported the ALE file and tried to import to Excel, the speech analysis data doesn’t;t show up. And you can’t copy and paste the data from the speech analysis text box. I don’t know why.

Now, I’m trying the Youtube auto text caption option. I exported an interview with timecode embedded in the video. I used a super low resolution because I only need the audio and I wanted the file to be small. The video was automatically transcribed, which was great. And I could download a file. But I can’t get Premiere to like the file. They just won’t display correctly.

But, I guess I could just copy the text and do the edit that way. The caption file has the file timecode listed. Copied the text, and pasted it “special” into a word doc, to preserve the formatting.

So, that’s where I’m at; Exporting clips of interviews to Youtube and then copying the captions to a transcript. It’s working so far, but I’m always open to a more efficient process.

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I’ve Been Busy…

I know it’s been a while since I’ve posted, but life has been busy.

I have been hard at work on my feature documentary. We are about to make a trip out to the last tournament. I’ve been working several paths to get the word out about the movie.

2 shirtsI’m selling a couple of shirts to help with funding the rest of the project. So if you want a sticker or shirt, swing on over the the website and see what you can do.

I’ve got a few things to share about the process of making this film, when the time is right.

And, honestly, I am so ready to be done with production, and into Post. I can’t wait to get these stories told.

My First Short Doc Film

I found what I think is my first real doc short. I’ve done interview/b roll projects for work and stuff for years. But this was a project I just wanted to do to educate about the importance of reading young. It’s from 2014 and stars my family.

Also, it was a pretty dry creative time for me. I was working corporate AV… too many hours for not enough pay. We were looking for a decent job, planning to move. We had sold our house and were living in my in-law’s home. I just needed to make something.

I had a 1st gen Canon EOS-M, a microphone and Zoom H4n recorder. I didn’t say, “Hey, let’s make a documentary film.” I just interviewed the family, shot some B roll and put it together. It’s too long, pacing is slow, the coloring is heavy handed, and I hate the music. But otherwise, not bad for throwing something together. Things have changed a lot in 4 years.

Creatively, it helped sustain me through a weird period.

I Don’t Understand the Amazon Video Algorithm

I have no idea how Amazon Video chooses what videos to show people.

I mean, I know that you can impact things by having more reviews, or sharing the links to the video and generating more traffic. But when that’s not happening, what makes Amazon Video show content to people?

Recently I saw a spike in older content that’s on Amazon Video, which I placed their through Amazon Video Direct. I’ve done zero promotion for this in the last year. It just sits there.

I assumed that people who are searching for religious video content on Amazon might stumble across it. And I’ve seen a steady trickle of payments that reflect that. I’m getting enough to pay for my lunch once a month. Not bad for content that was just sitting on a hard drive. AVD payments are always more than my similar content on Youtube. Always.

Then October happens. Suddenly there is a spike in minutes viewed and number of individual streams. And almost all of it is for the series. And based the a couple of reviews, the people seeing it aren’t looking for religious content. (It’s always a fun adventure to see how a non Christian reviewer sees content that is meant specifically for a Christian audience.)

So I don’t get how Amazon is populating the series to viewers. I search through Google to see if the link had been shared somewhere, but didn’t find anything other than the normal listings. Its actually easier to find the series on Youtube or Parables TV if you search on Google.

Overall the numbers of views aren’t huge, but its about 5 times what I normally get. Now, in November, the views have dropped back to the normal rate. I wish I understood this better so I can capitalize on it more when my doc film releases next year.

Technically Superior Internet Syndrome

There’s a virus infecting the internet. Really, it’s infecting internet users. Luckily there are steps you can take to protect yourself.

Symptoms of this infection are most easily seen in the comment sections of popular sites like Youtube or social media platforms. While it may show up anywhere, it’s rampant in tech communities.

The affliction comes on you like this: You do a Youtube search to find out more about a piece of gear, maybe a drone or camera. You watch a video, and realize that the video didn’t include some very critical information. So you have the overwhelming urge to comment, to share you’re superior understanding of the issue.

Maybe someone has asked a question in a group you frequent. But you know that the question, at it’s base level is fundamentally flawed. So, rather than answer the simple question, you proceed to explain why the original post is wrong headed and tell the world the correct approach, provide the correct information. At no time do you even consider answering the question as asked.

It can strike at any time, on any issue.

Here’s an example about van graphics:

Original post is looking for design inspiration. The two commenters were stricken with the need to share vital information, unrelated to the original question. One even correcting the 1st commenter.

I recently saw a comment on a professional videographer’s video about a drone flight. The commenter was quick to point out that the video has been taken illegally, since the location required a permit to fly drones. At no point did the commenter consider that the person flying the drone may have actually acquired a permit, and been flying with permission.

Once a member of a FB group posted an innocent questions about showing videos in their church. Rather than answer that question, several responders pointed out that showing the clips would be illegal without the proper licensing. At no time did the infected consider that the person asking the question might already know that. They assumed they knew better, and told everyone so.

Technically Superior Internet Syndrome (or T-SIS) is rampant.

There is at this time, no cure. But you can fight the symptoms by being aware of them, and taking a moment before you answer a question to make sue you’re actually answering a question. Pause before you tell the world how wrong someone is to make sure you know all the facts. Generally, if you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything. If you aren’t answering the question, don’t post.

Just a Few Hours Left in the Crowdfunding Campaign

Less than 7 hours until my crowdfunding campaign ends.

To be frank this one has been tough. I put in more work setting this one up than any of the previous ones. I had the “large” donors set up to drop their donations in the first few days. And I had built relationships in communities that will be the target audience for the finished movie.

When the campaign launched, I had several large donations come in. But almost zero small donations. When I did the campaigns for my TV show I had lots of small donations and almost no large ones. A couple of the communities I was in were a bust. I don’t know what happened to the rest.

But a few larger donations have come in outside the campaign. I am under $500 away from reaching the goal.

It’s not likely that I will reach it, but I will have enough to make the film, and tell these stories. Later, I will try to figure out how I misread my audience so much.

New Project!

I can’t believe I haven’t posted about this here, yet. I’ve been so busy with everything else, I’ve let you down. Here’s the deal. Some major news on the filmmaking front!

I’ve got a new major project. It’s a documentary film about competitive speech and debate. Here’s the pitch:

If My Judges Are Ready? is a documentary film project following a group of homeschool speech and debate competitors from Texas through the 2017-2018 season of competition as they work to reach and win the national tournament. The story is the personal struggle of each competitor to overcome their own limitations, perfect their pieces and navigate the tournament schedule in order to compete in the national tournament at the end of the season. More important than how they place is how they will grow and mature through the process. The film will give the audience a glimpse into the life of these competitors, show what it’s like to be in a club, to select content, practice and practice, be judged on performances, win, lose, and learn.

It’s a huge project. It will take a year to shoot and months to edit. But I’m excited to tell the story. Follow the link to the website to see production updates. Or sign up for my email list and get them right in your inbox!

Sigma 19mm DN Art f2.8 Amazing Lens with a Video Auto Focus Problem.

The very first lens I bought for my Sony a6000 was the 19mm Sigma DN Art f2.8. For under $200 you get a lens that is super sharp. According to most reviewers, dollar for dollar, it outperforms the competition.

Flag over Washington (Half Mast)I have been very happy with it. I’ve taken some great pictures. On an APS-C sensor, the 19mm is a handy focal length for catching pictures of kids inside the house. It’s not too bad for wider landscapes. Or shots like the one above.

There is a problem, however, when you use it with AF turned on for video recording.

I didn’t notice it for a long time. If you’re running hand held, you might never notice it. On Youtube it’s not easy to see, unless you’re looking for it. And I wasn’t. The I pulled up the footage on my computer. How could I miss this?

But now that I’ve seen it, I can’t look at any footage on a tripod or slider without seeing it. What is it?

Here’s a video that shows the issue very clearly. Watch the edges:

Slowed down like this, the jitter on the edges of the frame is very visible. I pulled down a few videos I shot with it. (But not everything.) But every video I’ve checked has the issue. I’ve used the lens for several videos, but none were reviews of the lens. All were about something else, so I didn’t notice. they look fine where the center of focus is, where your attention is drawn. I don’t “pixel peep” with most of my gear. The center of the lens is sharp, and looks great. But with the autofocus on, the edges shake and jitter.

When I was researching this lens, every review was positive. I didn’t find one mention of this issue. Now there are a few posts about it. Some videos like the one above. I’d hate for someone who wanted this lens for video to not know about this issue, so I’m doing my part.

I love this lens for pictures. But I can’t recommend it for video.

Why I Entered the Rode Reel Competition Even Though I Don’t Expect to Win- And Why You Should, Too

The Rode Reel short film competition is one of the largest in the world. Entries from 88 countries are all under 3 minutes long and must have been shot using a Rode microphone. In 2017 the prizes total over $500,000. If you watch finalists from previous years, many of them are just amazing looking, amazing sounding.

How can you or I, average independent filmmakers, compete? Why should we enter if we probably won’t win?

Perfecting your craft. Experience always teaches you. I made my first actual short documentary film. I learned a ton in the process and got to experiment with a new genre. Every project you complete has the potential to help you learn and improve. Do you think those Rode Reel finalists just woke up and magically were amazing filmmakers? No, they worked and worked. This is a chance for you to become a better filmmaker.

Exposure. We all have a sphere of influence. We have an existing audience, whether it’s just family and friends or something larger. But entering the Rode Competition will expose your work to potentially thousands of new viewers. Viewers who will meet you for the first time, who might find your social media contacts, who might subscribe to your channels. Viewers who could be fans of your work. And those viewers are available for free.

Free T shirt. And maybe more. If you’re among the first 1500(?) entries Rode will send you a nifty Rode Reel T shirt. Sometimes they throw in some of their small products. Who doesn’t like free stuff?

Deadline. Most of all, committing to enter places a real deadline in front of you. Talk is cheap. If you are actually a real filmmaker, what films are you making? A deadline puts a real goal in place. I wanted to enter last year, but I never committed. So I never entered.

So, want to see my entry?

You can watch it here: https://www.rode.com/myrodereel/watch/entry/3102 Hope you enjoy it. If you did, please take a minute and put in a vote for the People’s Choice award.

Before I submitted my film, I watched some of the finalists for that category in 2016. They were awesome. None of them were telling a story of an event. They were more like showcases, testimonies with nice B Roll. After completing my Rode Reel entry, I know why.

Trying to tell an actual story in 3 minutes, a non scripted story, is extremely hard. My film has a beginning, middle and an end. (Spoilers) There’s a mid point crisis and turn into the 3rd Act. But it all happens in 3 minutes. So it’s fast. I cut so much good stuff out I’m seriously considering an expanded version at a later date.

It’s not perfect, but it isn’t terrible either. And I can guarantee my next documentary will be better because of what I learned doing this one.

[Image courtesy of Greenleaf Designs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net]